Violet Vaughnes, Quilt Appraiser, Certified by the American Quilter’s Society, Paducah, Kentucky (USA) and member Professional Association of Appraisers--Quilted Textiles (PAAQT)

Some information used with permission of Beverly Dunivent, American Quilter’s Society Certified Quilt Appraiser.

 

To schedule a quilt appraisal please download the form:  Quilt Appraisal Form

 

Why Should Quilts Be Appraised?

 

Every year many quilts ranging in value from several hundred dollars to thousands of dollars are stolen, lost, or destroyed by some form of disaster. Because the owners of these quilts didn’t have them documented or insured, they did not have any recourse to recover the value of the quilts. People who spend months or years making quilts or spent large sums of money acquiring them, or inherit quilts that represent their family’s history often do not consider the fact that these quilts should be appraised and insured.

 

As a service to the quilt world, the American Quilter’s Society has developed a program to certify appraisers who are qualified to give insurance and fair market value to quilts and quilted textiles. Certified appraisers have been tested on their knowledge of dating fabrics and quilts, construction techniques, recognizing patterns and regional influences, and on their awareness of the dollar value of quilts. They have also agreed to a code of Ethical Practices.

 

In determining the dollar value of a quilt, we first look at the type of appraisal that is being done. If the appraisal is for a donation, an estate settlement, or for a quilt that is being sold, the fair market value would be given. The Internal revenue Service defines the fair market values “the price at which the property would change hands between a willing buyer and a willing seller, with neither being required to act, and both having reasonable knowledge of the relevant facts.” For these appraisals, to determine dollar value, we look to places where willing buyers and sellers have exchanged property. In this instance, it would be antique shops, quilt shows, galleries, auctions, dealers and advertisements.

 

If the appraisal is for insurance purposes, the replacement value for “like and kind” is used. That is, the price the owner would expect to pay to replace the quilt with one of comparable style, size, condition, and workmanship, etc., in today’s market. This value is not necessarily the price one can expect to receive when selling a quilt.

 

Violet Vaughnes, Quilt Appraiser, Certified by the American Quilter’s Society, Paducah, Kentucky (USA) and member Professional Association of Appraisers--Quilted Textiles (PAAQT)

Some information used with permission of Beverly Dunivent, American Quilter’s Society Certified Quilt Appraiser.